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TableFormat

Table Format is used to customize the behavior of the Fluvio consumer output type full-table.

With table-format, you can control the column labels, column ordering and control which keys are primary for displaying your live event data as row updates.

 

fluvio table-format

Install Fluvio plugins

Usage: fluvio install [OPTIONS] <PACKAGE>

Arguments:
  <PACKAGE>  The ID of a package to install, e.g. "fluvio/fluvio-cloud"

Options:
      --develop  Install the latest prerelease rather than the latest release
  -h, --help     Print help information (use `--help` for more detail)

This is the schema for the Table Format yaml config used by fluvio table-format create

You only need to give your Table Format a name, and an input format (currently only JSON is supported)

 

TableFormat Config schema

This is a definition of the TableFormat config schema. Below are the descriptions of each field of the config file.

Check out the examples section below to see a few different config files and their resulting table views.

type: object
required: ["name"]
properties:
name:
    type: string
    minimum: 1
    maximum: 100
inputFormat:
    type: string
    enum:
        - JSON
columns:
    type: array
    items:
        type: object
        properties:
            headerLabel:
                type: string
            keyPath:
                type: string
            primaryKey:
                type: boolean
 

Field descriptions

name

Required

This is the name of your Table Format. You’ll see this name when you run fluvio table-format list, and you’ll use this name with fluvio consume topic-name --table-format <name>

inputFormat

Required

The only supported option for this field is "JSON"

columns

optional array - The default column display will be the top-level keys (ordered alphabetically).

Each element references a key from input json object.

The ordering of each element is important, as it will be the order columns will be rendered.

keyPath

This is the only required column field. This should be a top-level key. If the key path doesn’t exist, the column will print with no data.

headerLabel

optional - default uses key name. Override the label of the column.

primaryKey

optional - default false. If specified to true, rendering updates to the table will compare the values of primary keys to define a set. When new data matches an existing set, it’s row will be updated. Otherwise it will append a new row to the table.

 

Examples

For the following examples, we’ll start off with our topic data arriving in this order.

{"key1":"a","key2":"1","key3":"Alice","id":123}
{"key1":"b","key2":"2","key3":"Bob","id":456}
{"key1":"c","key2":"3","key3":"Carol","id":789}
[{"key1":"x","key2":"10","key3":"Alice","id":123},{"key1":"y","key2":"20","key3":"Bob","id":456},{"key1":"c","key2":"30","key3":"Carol","id":789}]

The expected shape of the data is either:

  • a JSON object
  • a JSON array of objects
Example 0

No table-format

Using the full-table output without using a table-format print each key into a column in alphabetical order from left to right.

$ fluvio consume event-data -B --output full-table

Output:

┌('c' to clear table | 'q' or ESC to exit) | Items: 6─────────────────┐
│id                key1              key2              key3           │
│123               a                 1                 Alice          │
│456               b                 2                 Bob            │
│789               c                 3                 Carol          │
│123               x                 10                Alice          │
│456               y                 20                Bob            │
│789               c                 30                Carol          │
└─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
Example 1

Display a subset of data

In this example, we only want to display data for only 2 of the keys. The ordering of the columns will be key1 first, then key2.

Config:

# exampleformat1.yaml
name: "exampleformat1"
inputFormat: "JSON"
columns:
  - keyPath: "key1"
  - keyPath: "key2"

Create the table-format:

$ fluvio table-format create --config exampleformat1.yaml

Display your table:

$ fluvio consume event-data -B --output full-table --table-format exampleformat1

Output:

┌('c' to clear table | 'q' or ESC to exit) | Items: 6─────────────────┐
│key1                               key2                              │
│a                                  1                                 │
│b                                  2                                 │
│c                                  3                                 │
│x                                  10                                │
│y                                  20                                │
│c                                  30                                │
└─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
Example 2

Reorder columns

In this example, we rearrange the order so that the columns will be ordered: id, key3, key1, key2

Config:

# exampleformat2.yaml
name: "exampleformat2"
inputFormat: "JSON"
columns:
  - keyPath: "id"
  - keyPath: "key3"
  - keyPath: "key1"
  - keyPath: "key2"

Create the table-format:

$ fluvio table-format create --config exampleformat2.yaml

Display your table:

$ fluvio consume event-data -B --output full-table --table-format exampleformat2

Output:

┌('c' to clear table | 'q' or ESC to exit) | Items: 6─────────────────┐
│id                key3              key1              key2           │
│123               Alice             a                 1              │
│456               Bob               b                 2              │
│789               Carol             c                 3              │
│123               Alice             x                 10             │
│456               Bob               y                 20             │
│789               Carol             c                 30             │
└─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
Example 3

Rename columns

In this example, we’re rearranging the order of the columns, and changing the column header to something more meaningful for our data.

Config:

# exampleformat3.yaml
name: "exampleformat3"
inputFormat: "JSON"
columns:
  - keyPath: "id"
    headerLabel: "ID"
  - keyPath: "key3"
    headerLabel: "Name"
  - keyPath: "key2"
    headerLabel: "Number"
  - keyPath: "key1"
    headerLabel: "Letter"

Create the table-format:

$ fluvio table-format create --config exampleformat3.yaml

Display your table:

$ fluvio consume event-data -B --output full-table --table-format exampleformat3

Output:

┌('c' to clear table | 'q' or ESC to exit) | Items: 6─────────────────┐
│ID                Name              Number            Letter         │
│123               Alice             1                 a              │
│456               Bob               2                 b              │
│789               Carol             3                 c              │
│123               Alice             10                x              │
│456               Bob               20                y              │
│789               Carol             30                c              │
└─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
Example 4: Choose primary key for row-updates

For event-sourced data, it may be beneficial to display the most up-to-date data by updating the row with current values. To do this, we select a primary key within the data.

When new data arrives, if the values at the primary key match, we replace the row with the more recent data.

Config:

# exampleformat4.yaml
name: "exampleformat4"
inputFormat: "JSON"
columns:
  - keyPath: "id"
    headerLabel: "ID"
    primaryKey: true
  - keyPath: "key3"
    headerLabel: "Name"
  - keyPath: "key2"
  - keyPath: "key1"

Command:

$ fluvio table-format create --config exampleformat4.yaml

Display your table:

$ fluvio consume event-data -B --output full-table --table-format exampleformat4

Output:

┌('c' to clear table | 'q' or ESC to exit) | Items: 3─────────────────┐
│ID                Name              key2              key1           │
│123               Alice             10                x              │
│456               Bob               20                y              │
│789               Carol             30                c              │
└─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘